What’s in a Name?

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Keen-eyed readers will notice that this blog has recently changed its official name from Teaching is for Superheroes! to Teach Like a Superhero!  (The exclamation point remains!)

Not that big of a change, really, except that the new name rolls off the tongue a little more easily.  Another change is the primary web address:  http://www.teachlikeasuperheroblog.com.  This new URL is not very short, but it gets to the point.

(I tried a shorter address, but “www.tlash.com” sounds like an eyeliner product.  And a good of an excuse as any to share this meme inspired by Captain America: The Winter Soldier)

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If all of this http://www.mumbo.jumbo stresses you out, don’t worry.  The old web address, http://www.teachingsupeherheroes.wordpress.com, still works and will lead you right back here.

This post is not just an announcement about blog name changes.

Let’s talk about names of superheroes and names of teachers.

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I remember two things from my very first teacher back-to-school in-service meeting.  The first memory is a litany of details regarding health insurance and employee benefits.  The second memory is our assistant principal reminding us all that we are “Mr. Smith,” not “Smith” or “Mr. S.”

His point was to start the school year establishing a professional identify and requiring our students to address us as such.  It may seem like no big deal for a student to abbreviate your name (“Mr. B.”) or leave off your honorific (“Bergman”).  Some teachers may even welcome such nicknames to foster a more relaxed classroom environment.

But we must always be careful to not get too comfortable with our students.  Stop and consider the range of impacts this lackadaisical habit could impart.

I’m sure I’ve allowed my students to call me all sorts of things and get away with it.  But it does help to maintain a level of respect among everyone – teacher to student, student to teacher, teacher to teacher, student to student, and more.

Proper names matter among superheroes, too, and not just with maintaining secret identities.  Personally, I cringe whenever I read superheroes calling each other playful nicknames.

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They’re heroes, not BFFs!

Superhero nicknames have long been a staple in comics.  Witty banter and clever monikers keep the “funny” in funny books, after all.  And it helps convey some characters’ personalities.

Wolverine, for example, with Colossus:

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And here (off-panel) with Professor Xavier:

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The best name-caller, of course, was Stan “The Man” Lee, who was so proficient he even came up with nicknames for his real-life co-workers (e.g. Jack “The King” Kirby, “Jazzy” Johnny Romita, “Merry” Gerry Conway, and many MANY more right here).

Like any good joke, though, overuse of superhero sobriquets can get tiresome.  Especially among champions who should focus their attention on more important things – like fighting bad guys and saving the world!

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What’s worse, many of these affectionate nicknames can actually undermine the job of life-risking heroics.

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“Spidey” for Spider-Man works fine for his hip quippy character;  but take a look at other heroes and their less-dignified labels:

Batman = “Bats”

Superman = “Supes”

Green Lantern = “GL”

Ugh.  Apparently, characters in the DC Universe have a thing for abridging names.  Marvel nicknames, though more colorful, can still cheapen a heroic legacy.

The Mighty Thor = “Goldilocks”

The Hulk = “Ol’ Greenskin”

Iron Man = “Shellhead”

Captain America = “Cap,” “Winghead,” “Star-Spangled Avenger”

We come back to Captain America because it’s maybe the clearest example of a noble hero who’s legendary status is downgraded by casual familiarity.  And it’s not just by fellow heroes, but even by us regular citizens.

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Call me a Stick-in-the-Mud (“Bromidic Bergman”), but superheroes deserve a little more formality.  The same goes for teachers.  Although it may seem cool for kids to use teacher nicknames, be careful with letting things get too capricious or contemptuous.

So whenever you hear a student or colleague refer to you as  “Mrs. T” or “Thompson” or “Yo, Teach,” gently remind them how they can address you more properly.

Just remember, it’s not “Mr. F.” It’s Mr. Fantastic.

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And it’s not “Incredible;” it’s Mr. Incredible.

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And it’s not “Marvel;” it’s Ms. Marvel.

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Actually, the original Ms. Marvel goes by Captain Marvel now.

But never “Cap.”

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Dress for Success

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Back to school time is here, which means families are filling department stores to find the best bargains. But it’s not just students. Teachers are also looking to stock up on supplies and spruce up their wardrobes.

Take a look at a typical “Back To School” advertisement or website and you’ll see gobs of superhero clothing and accessories. Superheroes are famous for how they look just as much as they are for what they do.

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The good folks at Newsarama recently listed their “10 Best Live-Acton Superhero Costumes” and “10 Worst Live-Action Superhero Costumes.”

Here are some helpful lessons teachers can learn from these lists:

#1 – Maintain Functionality

Many of the “Best” costumes work because they look like something you could actually see in real life.  Rather than adhering too closely to garish comic book colors or styles, the designers keep things grounded and user-friendly.

TheDarkKnight Teachers should consider their daily tasks and possible actions, then dress appropriately.  Fabric that breathes, stretches, and covers is a must, along with some comfortable footwear.

Comfortable shoes, yes, but NO SNEAKERS (unless you teach gym).  Strapping on a pair of Asics Gel Virage 4 shoes is the quickest way to ruin an otherwise perfect teacher outfit.

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(It’s called “business casual,” NOT “business triathlon.”)

If you need super-supportive shoes that are also subtle, take a look at this list provided by We Are Teachers (although I squirm at the sight of #10).  This focus on footwear leads us to another lesson from live-action superheroes.

#2 – Focus on Simplicity

A quick comparison of the “Best” and “Worst” film costumes reveals a glaring difference in details.  In many cases, the outfits in the “Worst” category are just TOO MUCH.

BatmanAndRobin Resisting the impulse to add another buckle here or kneepad there, the “best” outfits keep it simple.  By doing so, these film versions highlight key elements that evoke iconic imagery.  In some cases, this means ditching the costume and favoring functional garb (see #1 above) with hints of style and symbolism.

Wolverine Teachers are iconic, and their choice of clothing should reflect their critical role in society.  Instead of chasing the latest fashion (floral vs. geometric print, fat tie vs. skinny tie, boot-cut vs. skinny jeans), focus on conveying an image that is classy and timeless–just like good teaching.

In case you think it’s passé to stick with the basics, take a look at two USA Today articles about teacher attire.  One is from 2003, the other from 2012.

Despite being nearly a decade apart, both articles list some of the same “Should’s” and “Should Not’s” for teacher apparel and appearance.  Neat and clean are always “in.”  Spaghetti straps, tight tops, short bottoms, excessive piercings and tattoos should stay out of the classroom.

#3 – Lean toward Conservative

We’re talking clothing here, not politics.  (Vote your conscience.)  In discussing attire, teachers should consider how to keep the focus on learning as opposed to fashion.

Whenever you struggle with what to wear, here are several mottos you can remember:  “Dress older.” “Dress like your boss.” “Dress for the job you want.”

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“Teacher” is not the first profession that comes to mind.

These sayings will help with decisions as you stand in front of your closet.   Skewing conservative also works as you stand in front of the bathroom mirror.  Just like excessive makeup on movie superheroes, teachers with too much mascara will likely turn off their students.

#4 – Tone down the CGI

GreenLantern ‘Nuff said.

Hopefully these Hollywood examples will help teachers consider their choice of classroom attire.  For anyone wanting more ideas, check out this Education World article discussing jeans and flip-flops, or this About Education blog with useful guidelines, especially for younger teachers.

And remember:  Save the cosplay for your pets. Batman Dog